Five Little Speckled Frogs/Fingerplay song

Here is another fun song to sing with your child.

Five Little Speckled Frogs

Five Little Speckled Frogs (Hold five fingers (frogs) on top of your
other arm (log)
Sat on a speckled log
Eating the most delicious bugs. Yum! Yum!
One jumped into the pool (jump a finger off the log into the pool)
Where it was nice and cool
Now there are Four green speckled frogs (Hold up four fingers)

Four Little Speckled Frogs
Sat on a speckled log
Eating the most delicious bugs. Yum! Yum!
One jumped into the pool
Where it was nice and cool
Now there are Three green speckled frogs

Three little speckled frogs
Sat on a speckled log
Eating the most delicious bugs. Yum! Yum!
One jumped into the pool
Where it was nice and cool
Now there are Two green speckled frogs

Two little speckled frogs
Sat on a speckled log
Eating the most delicious bugs. Yum! Yum!
One jumped into the pool
Where it was nice and cool
Now there is one green speckled frog

One little speckled frog
Sat on a speckled log
Eating the most delicious bugs. Yum! Yum!
It jumped into the pool
Where it was nice and cool
Now there is no more speckled frogs

Benefits: It teaches words, numbers, animals, rhythm and rhymes.

This song is great for all ages.

I hope you and your child enjoy this fun song!

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Slime!

Where I live, it’s a rainy day. Halloween is around the corner, too. What’s the perfect activity? Making some slime!

Materials Needed

  • 2 cups cornstarch
  • 1 cup water
  • Food coloring (optional)
  • Sauce Pan
  • Large Bowl
  • Sealable Plastic Bag
Procedure
  • Heat water in a saucepan. Make sure that the water is only warm, not boiling. You will find it easy to work with warm water.
  • Pour the warm water into a large bowl and add few drops of food coloring to it. The commonly used color for slime is green. To make it look even more disgusting, mix in red food color as well.
  • Blend the food color into the water, by mixing it well. The water should be one shade darker than the color of slime you want, because cornstarch tends to lighten the color.
  • Slowly add cornstarch to the colored water. Mix the starch in water thoroughly, using your fingers. Blend it well, until it becomes a thick and smooth paste.
  • The final cornstarch mixture should neither be too watery, nor too dry. It should be wet enough to drip through your fingers, but dry to touch. If you do not reach the right consistency, add more water or cornstarch.
  • Your homemade slime is ready! Make sure to preserve it in a sealable plastic bag.

Ocean in a bottle

It’s the end of the summer, let’s capture the ocean in a bottle. This is a fun science/art  activity you can do with your child.  You can talk about why the water and oil are separated from each other, color, and different things with the ocean. The waves, currents, creatures, etc.

What you will need:

Empty two liter plastic bottle with lid
Baby oil, clear vegetable oil or mineral oil
Water funnel
Food coloring
Small star fish, shells or other sea creatures
One tsp glitter
White craft glue
Hot glue

How to make it:

Wash and dry two-liter bottle and remove all labels
Fill bottle halfway with tap water
Add a few drops of food coloring and swirl around to mix
Add glitter, sea creatures
Fill bottle the rest of the way with oil using a funnel
Be sure that rim and cap are dry, then apply white craft glue around the rim. Seal cap. Use a layer of hot glue around the outer edge of the cap for added protection from leakage
Turn bottle on its side and gently rock the bottle to create a “wave” inside your ocean habitat!

Note: You can also do this with just the first four items, and even use a smaller bottle. Just be sure that either one you use the cap is sealed with tape or glue.

Benefits: Colors,  motor skills, cause and effect, measuring, cooperation, listening and following directions, sensory pleasure, new vocabulary: waves, current, flow, fluid, transform.

This activity is best for ages 3-9. Use your judgment on your child’s abilities.

Finger Paint

Kids love to finger paint. They love the messiness and how it feels in their fingers.

There are a lot of different recipes to make your own finger paints right at home! I would love to share a few with you so you can try them too!

All recipes are washable

Number One — Ingredients

  • 2 Tablespoons Sugar
  • 1/3 Cup of cornstarch
  • 2 Cups water
  • 1/4 Cup dishwashing soap
  • food coloring

Put the sugar and cornstarch in a saucepan and then slowly mix in cold water. Then cook the mixture over low heat for 5 minutes, stirring constantly until you have a smooth gel. Let cool and then add dishwashing soap. Divide into as many containers as you would like colors and then mix in food coloring drops until you have you desired color. If you have colored dishwashing soap that can influence all the colors you try to create, which isn’t always a bad thing.

Tip: Use baby food jars to divide and store the paint! They are a perfect size for kids to dip their fingers or brushes into and they can be sealed easily if you have leftover paint.

Number Two — Ingredients

3 cups water
1 cup cornstarch
food coloring

Directions

In a medium saucepan, bring water to a boil.  Dissolve cornstarch in a separate bowl with water.   Remove boiling water from heat and add cornstarch mixture.  Return to heat, stirring constantly.  Boil until the mixture is clear and thick (about 1 minute).  Remove from heat.

As the mixture is cooling, divide into separate bowls and add food coloring.  Let the children carefully mix in the coloring.

Tips

  • Add 1 tbsp of glycerin to make the mixture shiny.  You can find glycerin in most drugstores or pharmacies.

Number Three — Ingredients

1/2 cup cornstarch
3 Tbsp. sugar
1/2 tsp. salt
2 cups cold water
food coloring

Directions

In a medium pan, mix all the ingredients together to make the finger paint. Cook over low heat 10 to 15 minutes. Keep stirring the finger paint mixture until it is smooth and thick. After the finger paint has thickened take the pan off the stove and let the mixture cool.

After cooling, divide the finger paint into storage containers depending on how many colors you would like. Add a few drops of food coloring to each container. Stir the coloring in to the paint to determine the shade of color. You’re ready to finger paint! Cover tightly when storing.

Number Four — Ingredients

3 cups water
1 cup cornstarch
food coloring

Directions

In a medium saucepan, bring water to a boil.  Dissolve cornstarch in a separate bowl with water.   Remove boiling water from heat and add cornstarch mixture.  Return to heat, stirring constantly.  Boil until the mixture is clear and thick (about 1 minute).  Remove from heat.

As the mixture is cooling, divide into separate bowls and add food coloring.  Let the children carefully mix in the coloring.

Hints:

  • Add 1 tbsp of glycerin to make the mixture shiny.  You can find glycerin at most drugstores or pharmacies.

Number Five (No Cook Recipe)— Ingredients

2 cups white flour
2 cups cold water
food coloring

Directions

Put water into a large bowl.  Slowly add the flour, while the children are stirring.  Once it’s all mixed together, divide into smaller bowls and add food coloring.

Two Edible Finger Paints

Pudding Finger Paint

Vanilla Pudding Mix (Instant)
Food Coloring

Directions:

  • Make the vanilla pudding according to package directions. Divide into portions and mix in different food coloring for each portion. Paint away!
  • This finger paint is edible. If you use food coloring sparingly this is a washable finger paint.

Jello Finger paint Recipe

Jello Powder
Boiling Water

Directions:

  • Slowly add boiling water to the Jello powder (constantly stirring) until you have a thick consistency. Add ice to thicken and cool down the Jello quickly. Use when cool.

Benefits: Colors, texture, promotes creativity

This activity is good for all ages, depending on the recipe you are using. Use your own judgment on your child’s abilities.

Round and Round the Garden

Singing is so important for children. It helps enrich your child’s language development, gives them comfort, and connects you both together.  Songs can teach your child of new things such as animals, and numbers. Even as babies they love the rhymes and rhythm.

Here is a fun song to sign with your child, babies especially love this song.

Round and Round the Garden

Round and round the garden (draw circle on child’s tummy)

Goes the teddy bear.

One step, two steps… (walk your fingers up his chest or arm)

Tickle him under there! (tickle under his chin or under the arm)

Benefits: Shape, connects you with your child, rhymes, rhythms, and language development

This song is great for all ages

Clay Play

Children between two and three love to play with things they can squeeze, pound, break apart and put back together.

Here’s a recipe to make your own play dough that you probably already have right in the kitchen.

  • 1 cup salt
  • 1 1/2 cups flour
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 2 tablespoons oil
  • a few drops of food coloring (optional)

1. Mix the flour, salt, and water. If necessary, add more flour until mixture has a doughy, but not sticky, consistency. Add food coloring for vibrancy. You can also let your child help pour everything together. This is a great way to learn numbers, measuring, and how mixing things you can create something new. Talk about it together.

This dough lasts for weeks if you store it in the refrigerator in a plastic bag or covered jar. Or they can make “things” and leave them out to dry and harden. Small children may put the dough in their mouths. It won’t taste good, but it also won’t hurt them. You can use a cookie sheet for a working place or the kitchen table. Dust his hands with a little flour, so the dough doesn’t stick to his hands. S/he may just want to pound it, or he may want to try using the following things:

  • rolling-pin
  • cookie cutter
  • dull knives, forks and spoons
  • craft Popsicle sticks

Benefits: Colors, shapes, numbers, measuring, promotes creativity, encourages generosity (make gifts), fine motor skills

This activity is best for children 2+.Please also note: I first made play dough for my son at less than 18 months. Use your judgment on your child’s abilities. 🙂

Tip: Let your child take the lead

When doing anything with your child, don’t expect them to perfectly grasp what you are doing. This is especially true for babies-preschool aged children. They understand a large concept, but they also have their own ideas even from a young age. Don’t worry if your child does something completely different from what you have set up. In fact, be proud. They have the confidence to come up with an idea and follow through with it. With you behind them, it makes them feel empowered. Unless your child is putting himself or others in danger, let him do what he wants with the activity.

For example, the clothespins game I posted, my son has played both games I have mentioned. However, the other day when I brought it out he instead put some of his small toys inside and gave them a “bath.” I thought this was fantastic! I would have never even thought of that. Even doing things like this, with their own ideas (something you or I would have never thought of) teaches them new things. It’s also a chance for them to show off and practice the skills they already have.

Benefits: We talked about bathing, numbers (how many items were in the bath), and body parts, in a fun and playful way. Things I said were “Do you think his head needs to be washed?” He would wash his head. “His foot looks so dirty.” Give your child a chance to talk too.

Laugh, play and learn away!